Introducing Brave Star Selvage

Brave Star Selvage

Brave Star Selvage

These days selvedge and raw denim have moved away from the shadows in which they hid and have emerged into fashion’s spotlight. A quick walk through any clothing store will most likely find some kind of raw and/or selvedge denim that range in quality, price, and availability.

As more brands and stores pick up and offer raw denim, there are several companies rethinking the traditional idea of creating a range of products and styles, pitching to retailers, and selling it through brick and mortar retail locations.

Selvedge and Chainstitch details on Brave Star Selvedge

Selvedge and Chainstitch details on Brave Star Selvage jeans

Mik and Maria Serfonatine, founders of Brave Star Selvage, have a long history creating denim products over the last 10-15 years. They’ve noticed that far too often, there are customers who appreciate quality made products but are unable to afford to pay $200+ for jeans and end up settling for a product that is cheaper but drastically reduced in quality.

With these customers in mind, they sought a way to offer high quality jeans but at a price that is more generally accessible. Much like San Francisco brand Gustin, who offer their jeans to customers directly online and eliminating the costs associated with selling at retail locations, Brave Star Selvage has found a way to utilize the internet to lower the price while still maintaining a high quality in their jeans.

Brave Star Skinny and Slim Tapered fits

Brave Star Skinny and Slim Tapered fits

Brave Star Slim Straight and True Straight fits

Brave Star Slim Straight and True Straight fits

The brand is still in the beginning phase but even in this initial point they’re offering four different cuts and several types of fabric. As they grow, they will be offering even more options and essentially giving the customer the ability to choose not only the cut and fabric, but also details details such as thread color, leather patch, and color of the star pocket detail.

Their core fabric is a 13 Oz. sanforized red line Cone Mills denim that will always be available and they’ll also be cycling through other types of American and Japanese fabrics in limited quantities. All their products are made in their warehouse in LA by a dedicated team they’ve put together.

Sample of Brave Star Selvage's 15.5oz Cone Mills denim in a Slim Taper fit

Sample of Brave Star Selvage‘s 15.5oz Cone Mills denim in a Slim Taper fit

As far as the actual quality of the jean, I had a chance to see a sample one of their jeans they will be offering soon. This particular jean was a slim taper fit made from a 15.5 Oz. Cone Mills fabric. While there are a few details that are missing on the sample that will on the final product such as heavy pocket bags and a branded top button, it is a solid jean.

Cleanly cut and stitched, it features a larger coin pocket with selvedge detailing that can actually fit an iPhone as well as a chain stitch hem, a branded leather patch, and a distinguishing star on the right back pocket.

Leather patch

Leather patch

As these details can all be customized in the future, those who always wanted to have more control over the details on their jeans will finally be able to do so without burning a large hole in their wallets. Unfortunately, the sample was not in my size so I was not able to provide any fit pictures but their website does offer fit pics as well as measurements and comparisons to more popular Levi’s cuts for reference.

Large coin pocket with selvedge detail

Large coin pocket with selvedge detail

Though we’re unfortunately one day too late in sharing news of their Kickstarter campaign, the goods new is that they have reached their goal of $20,000. Hop over to their website if you’d like to sign up for Brave Star Selvage‘s launch; otherwise check out their blog and the video below to learn more about their fabrics, cuts, measurements, and more.

Young Lee

Young Lee

Young is a self proclaimed taco and denim enthusiast who plays in the San Francisco bands, The Soonest , and Theres Talk. He regularly posts pictures relating to denim and menswear on Tumblr, Liverpool and Main and Instagram, Young of The Soonest.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/devan.prithipaul Devan Prithipaul

    seems like a copy of Gustin but worse. i don’t like the leather patch and other than the price and accessibility, i don’t really see what’s unique or interesting about these. i don’t really like this trend because now there is another brand coming up with the exact same story as Gustin and Brave Star Selvage , RPMWEST is doing the same selvedge, buying at wholesale, $90 pair of jeans.

    • Smatty

      is this like a copy of Gusting? its like worse but better? i don’t understand why I am commenting? Is my comment unique or interesting? coin pocket selvedge is interesting tho. great article also!

    • ramartz

      Much agreed, Devan. How are they really trying to differentiate?

    • frank

      So what if they’re using the same marketing tactics to bring cheaper, quality denim? Just because they all buy wholesale and selling online doesn’t mean they’re a ripoff of eachother. its like saying 2 pairs of jeans you find in store are the same cuz they’re both blue.

      • Technicality

        It’s not a marketting tactic, it’s a different business model.

      • http://www.facebook.com/devan.prithipaul Devan Prithipaul

        i don’t know if its all that good quality, selling online is not a new concept, so why is it that they can charge so much less for the “same thing”. i don’t really think it is the same thing, if everyone could make
        $100 denim while still making profit wouldnt they? i feel like there is something strange/ wrong happening.

  • oilpit

    The raw denim market is becoming so over saturated it’s ridiculous

    • Chris

      How long till they all go bust i wonder?

      • Ryan Chinaski

        unfortunately, probably sooner than later. some will survive but others just won’t be able to develop a strong enough following.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003326974874 Kyle Brooks Robinson

    This is undoubtedly the first denim brand to (almost) share a name with a 1980s cartoon series.

    • BillygoatsGruff312

      BraveStarr!

  • Sillywizard

    I like the logotype, patch and the little embroidered star on the back pocket is a subtle, nice touch. But otherwise, meh. I agree with Devan that this comes off as a Los Angeles Gustin.

    • Sillywizard

      I forgot to add that I wish them the best of luck and hope they have fun with their endeavour.

  • asdfgghj

    for once i agree with devan, apart from the nice looking coin pocket, the rest is quite generic. that star embroidery is a nice touch.

  • Phil

    What do you guys want to see out of a new denim company? cool embroidery? colourful threads? well go buy a pair of true religions. Every pair of jeans will come off as bland or generic cuz the raw denim community wants they’re jeans to be simple. You guys are always quick to say its boring and generic. What do you guys expect to see from a upcoming company?

    • http://www.facebook.com/devan.prithipaul Devan Prithipaul

      Well for an example of a company that did denim differently there was that motorcycle denim company that used kevlar in their denim. that’s cool and different. i would like to see different fits, different dying methods, maybe different fabrics, just something to set you apart in the market. Gustin was cool and nice, we don’t need 2 more Gustin’s!

      • phil

        That would probably cost more money. If the company’s goal is to have lower prices, then that would be tough. unless you do what naked & famous does and get your denim from some unknown mills.

        • Chris

          None of these companies are aiming for a low price point they just churn out jeans at £200 and write ‘we had a dream to produce authentic denim for those that car about quality, they are made of the finest cotton and woven in japan on old shuttle looms, they come with a selvage that jut breathes quality and weigh 14oz’ yawn yawn yawn.
          I mentioned this elsewhere but im just sick of the generic product they produce. Think of something original please…..

          • Lucas

            Bravestar is producing jeans at a low price. At $79 on their Kickstarter, I’d say that’s one of the cheapest pairs of Selvedge I’ve seen on the market. Also they’re made in the USA, which is something the other cheaper brands can’t say.

            You guys can ask all you want for something new and original, but what originality are you looking for in a pair of jeans that won’t make them look Gotti or goofy. It’s denim, people have been making jeans for hundreds of years, It’s hard to make a product that looks original anymore. The one thing that will stay original (somewhat) is the story behind the company, and who the company is.

            Bash Bravestar all you want, but for only $79 a pair, I’m not going to be mad if the quality isn’t there, like I would on a $200-$300 pair of jeans.

            -By no means am I standing up for Bravestar, but simply adding my $0.02 about it all.

          • Chris

            Apologies, I wasn’t thorough in researching the price.

            I guess they do have something to offer them, like unbranded.

          • Sillywizard

            Good and fair argument Lucas. By setting their price at a wholesale price level, then they are trying to differentiate themselves from the pack who profile themselves at other price levels. Price is as important an aspect as anything else in a product’s profile.

          • Chris

            Indeed. Just like mastermind’s veblen approach.

        • Devan Prithipaul

          Pardon my lack of knowledge, why would using an unknown mill cost less? I’m sure it does, but how exactly it does is what I’m asking.

          • Phil

            I’m just saying that if you produce your products with denim from well known mills, it will probably cost abit more. If you use some different, lesser known mills it might be cheaper.

          • Chris

            Its quality driven ultimately and reputation on being able to meet demand/be reliable. Its also of course hype driven.

      • Chris

        Maple jeans i remember they are called.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Anthony-Savoy/1496635844 Anthony Savoy

    I would like to see an end to the skinny jean fad and a return to more traditional masculine cuts

    • http://twitter.com/JohnnyBravvo John Chapman

      It ain’t a fad. They, along with many other denim companies, are making different cuts to fit different types of bodies. With that said, I don’t see why any dude would want to wear “extra” material prevalent in “traditional” cuts. Tailoring is paramount.

  • http://twitter.com/SelfEdge Self Edge – Kiya

    That “signature star” embroidery looks very familiar: http://www.selfedge.com/uploaded_images/sexsc_sufu_04-784764.jpg

    • http://twitter.com/JohnnyBravvo John Chapman

      Ruh-roh, Raggy…

      • http://www.rawrdenim.com Rawr Denim

        Wow. Thanks for sharing, Kiya.

    • Sillywizard

      Good eye Kiya! You called them out on that one!
      +1 Kiya
      – 10 million Brave Star

    • BillygoatsGruff312

      womp womp.

  • http://twitter.com/JohnnyBravvo John Chapman

    I’ve had a couple conversations with Mik via Instagram and like what he’s doing. I think his range of cuts are good, especially with the smaller leg openings combined with the higher rises (a difficult combo to find for someone who likes the tailored look and who also does not like to also have to constantly pull his pants up, as is common with low rises). With that said, I would love to see some more companies using stitching on the pocket, a la Iron Heart, The Flat Head and my personal Imperial’s. The lack of pocket stitching common with today’s raw is my only gripe.

    • greySky

      Interesting, i actually prefer no pocket stitching at all. I usually stay away from the brands that have it because it’s not my thing. I guess it’s good that we have variety then!

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003326974874 Kyle Brooks Robinson

      I completely agree, a nice pocket design is what really makes Flat Head, Iron Heart, Ande Whall, etc. stand out from the pack (in addition to the merits of the denim and construction.) There are way too many “Authentic American Dry Goods And Supplies & Bros.” bland sanforized jeans out there. Good, unique detailing and crazy fabrics woven by hacked shuttle looms are what new companies need to aspire toward.

      • Grandier

        “& Bros.”

        that made my day, thank you.

  • MOHSIN SAJID / ENDRIME

    I think everybody needs a chance… but this concept has been done before… Its a huge responsibly to be in a situation, where your a designer and have the ability to design. Real Design is doing something new, and moving things forward for advancement and not copying anyone 1:1 – i wish them luck.

  • cincinnatus

    I saw this on the “brands page” on the forum and I was hoping it wouldn’t get an article. I’ll re-iterate my comment. Kickstarter? For real? What about the small time denim makers? What about the single man brands… none of them needed a kickstarter. Their love was a kickstarter. Shit. I’m all for a collective effort to help start a great brand and help some awesome people out… but show me where the soul is in Wholesale Denim. Its easy to find that soul in these other Start Up brands.

    • http://twitter.com/SelfEdge Self Edge – Kiya

      Took the words right out of my mouth.

      • Driftwoode

        Soul? Give me a break; it’s a pair of jeans! Unless you’re ready to set up an altar with a pair jeans surrounded by some candles and incense, then please spare me the whole “soul” in selvedge denim bullshit. We can all appreciate Roy denim, but that doesn’t mean we need to worship them (or pay the high price for them, for that matter). I, for one, see denim in a much more practical sense and if I can get a quality pair of American sourced and American made selvedge denim for a decent price, then all the better. I wish them the best of luck.

  • cincinnatus

    “They’ve noticed that far too often, there are customers who appreciate quality made products but are unable to afford to pay $200+ for jeans and end up settling for a product that is cheaper but drastically reduced in quality”

    If you appreciate quality. Then pay for quality.

  • greySky

    I don’t like the patch, but I like the different cuts, and oddly I kind of like that little star (whether ripped off or not). Liking anything on the back pockets is a big deal to me, because I usually hate all of it. I could do this one though. However, I don’t really like going with the basic raw jeans, maybe eventually. I’m more of a N&F guy, looking at the shadow selvedge next from 3sixteen. I like jeans that are interesting and unique, though I understand traditional will and should always be around. For the price, it looks great. If I wanted traditional i’d hit it.

  • Jay

    Just like Gustin, the smallest waist is too big.

  • http://twitter.com/DCRainbowJeans Daniel Carman

    I have nothing against what this brand is trying to do. If they are passionate about denim, give it a shot. My only gripe with their concept is this whole “cut out the middleman” or “eliminating retail stores from the supply chain”. Yes, I am a retailer and I going to stick up for my continued existence in the “supply chain”. Without a retailer though, who is going to show the customer how Brave Star fits, looks, and what it should be worn with? How do people try it on? Seems like a lot of trial & error ordering a pair of raw jeans directly from the manufacturer and HOPING they fit they way you visually see them on the internet. Retailers have their own relationships & client base, and without tapping into their communities, how are you possibly going to convince a legion of denim lovers to like YOUR brand over another? Every great denim brand in the world has experienced success with the help & support of partnering retailers. Good luck to Brave Star, you better have the best made denim known to humankind if you are doing it without retailers…DC

  • tacomanative

    I think the more start up companies the better. We don’t need just a small pool of big denim brands churning out overly creative designs. We want jeans that fit and fade beautifully. If a small brand opened up in my town I’d be thrilled to buy and wear something I knew was made ethically and locally.

  • BlakeAdam

    Hello gentlemen. Collectively, what would make a cool denim brand? I like the comment that mentioned that a cool jean brand isn’t the jean anymore but the story behind the brand…

  • alwaysright

    Godawful. Please stop.